Darío Fernández-Morera Associate Professor

Fernández Morera teaches courses in Golden Age and Medieval Spanish literature, culture and history. He has served in the United States National Council for the Humanities.  His writings include several books and editions and many articles and review articles in English and Spanish on cultural, historical and theoretical and methodological issues in Spain, Latin America and the United States, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians, Cervantes, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Inca Garcilaso, Vicente Aleixandre, Islamic Spain, and Modernism.  He has published articles, reviewed books and served as consultant and reader for History of European Ideas, The European Legacy, Symposium, Hispanic Review, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, Revista Canadiense de Estudios Hispánicos, Comparative Civilizations Review, Modern Age, etc.  Among his publications are The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise: Muslims, Christians and Jews under Islamic Rule in Medieval Spain; American Academia and the Survival of Marxist Ideas; The Lyre and the Oaten Flute: Garcilaso and the Pastoral; Fray Luis: Poesía (ed); Europe and its Encounter with the Amerindians (ed.); Cervantes in the English Speaking World (ed. with M. Hanke); Cervantes y su mundo II (ed with K. Reichenberger).  He is the recipient of the 2008 award for Graduate Teaching Excellence from the School of Continuing Studies.  He has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Sample publications online: 

“Cervantes and Economic Theory,” in Literature and the Economics of Liberty, ed. Paul Cantor (Auburn: Ludwig von Mises Institute, 2005), 99-165 PDF
https://mises.org/library/literature-and-economics-liberty-spontaneous-order-culture

"Cervantes and Islam" in Cervantes y su mundo 3, ed. K. Reichenberger (Kassel: Reichenberger, 2005) at
http://books.google.com/books?id=NQz5W94fbysC&pg=PA123&lpg=PA137&ots=WAirwAnr1G&dq=christians+enslaved+cantigas&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

"The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise," Intercollegiate Review, vol. 41, no. 2
https://home.isi.org/taxonomy/term/149
and directly as PDF
http://www.mmisi.org/ir/41_02/fernandez-morera.pdf

"Don Quixote Redivivus" in Cervantes in the English Speaking World, ed. Dario Fernandez-Morera & Michael Hanke (Kassel-Barcelona: Reichenberger, 2005) 165-191 at
https://books.google.com/booksid=cl_ax1FAM64C&printsec=frontcover&dq=Cervantes+in+the+English+Speaking+World&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFvYeV3rTLAhXI6CYKHWFfA7YQ6AEIJjAA#v=onepage&q=Cervantes%20in%20the%20English%20Speaking%20World&f=false

”Cervantes’ Theory and Practice of the Modern Novel,” in double issue of CIEFL Bulletin vol. 15 no. 2 and vol. 16 no. 1, pp. 49-66.

A tv interview on “Jorge Luis Borges: El Argentino Universal,” Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Guatemala, 21 August, 2009.
http://newmedia.ufm.edu/gsm/index.php?title=Jorge_Luis_Borges,_el_argentino_universal

A tv interview on “Francisco de Vitoria,” Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Guatemala, May 13 2010 :
http://newmedia.ufm.edu/gsm/index.php?title=Fernandezmoreravitoria

A podcast interview on The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise; interviewed by Professor Anthony Gill, University of Washington, December 8 2015
http://www.researchonreligion.org/player/index.php?episode=RoR_270_Morera_12082015

Shock and Awe, Eighth-Century Style: The Muslim Conquest of Spain - See more at: https://home.isi.org/shock-and-awe-eighth-century-style-muslim-conquest-spain#_ednref28

Vocal Point interview with Dr. Dario Fernandez-Morera on The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise: Muslims, Christians and Jews under Muslim Rule in Medieval Spain, March 24 2016
http://www.jerrynewcombe.com/vocal-point-dr-dario-fernandez-morera/

“Inca Garcilaso’s Comentarios Reales: or Who Tells the Story of a Conquered Civilization,” Comparative Civilizations Review 58 (2008): 6-19.

When the Spirits Collided: Islam and Christianity in the Course of Western Civilization: a review of Emmet Scott’s Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: the History of a Controversy, Library of Law and Liberty (August 26 2012)